Children & Divorce

/Children & Divorce
Children & Divorce Rina Goodman 2018-09-07T15:12:41-08:00

Books For Preschoolers & Early Elementary

(Non-Fiction)

Annie Stories: A Special Kind of Storytelling, by Doris Brett. Workman Publishing (March 1, 1988).

Dinosaurs Divorce: A Guide for Changing Families by Laurene & Marc Brown. Little Brown (1986).

Families are Forever! Kids Workbook for Sharing Feelings About Divorce, by Melissa Smith. Changing Lives Publications (December 1, 1999).

My Story, by Jim Boulden and Joan Beaverville. A coloring and activity book for child and family designed to help a child find his or her place in the process.

Let’s Talk About It: Divorce, by Fred Rogers. Paper Star Book; reissue edition (October 1, 1998).

Talking About Family Breakup, by Jillian Powell. Raintree Steck-Vaughn (1999).

We’re Having a Tuesday, by Dk Simoneau. AC Publications Group (April 1, 2006)

(Fiction)

Bernard, by Bernard Waber. Houghton Mifflin/Walter Lorraine Books; Reprint edition (October 27, 1986).

Dear Daddy, by John Schindel. Albert Whitman and Company (1995).

Ginger Brown: Too Many Houses (First Stepping Stone Books) by Sharon Dennis Wyeth. Random House (1996).

It’s not Your Fault, Koko Bear, by Vicky Lansky. Book Peddlers (1998).

Books for Teens (13 to 17)

(Non-fiction)

Divorce is Not the End of the World, by Zoe & Evan Stern. Tricycle Press (1997). (May be appropriate for children ages 9+.)

How to Survive Your Parents’ Divorce: Kids’ Advice to Kids, by Gayle Kimball. Equality Press (1994).

How It Feels When Parents Divorce, by Jill Krementz. Knopf (February 12, 1988).

Teens and Divorce, by Gail B. Stewart

The Divorce Helpbook for Teen, by Cynthia MacGregor

The Feeling Book, by Dr. Lynda Madison – American Girl Library (This book is probably suitable for preteens and young teens.)

The Kid’s Survival Guide to Separation, Divorce, and Stepfamilies (For kids 8-14 years old and their parents), by Isolina Ricci. Fireside/Simon and Schuster (2006)

We’re Having a Tuesday, by Dk Simoneau. AC Publications Group (April 1, 2006)

When Your Parents Split Up: How to Keep Yourself Together (Plugged In), by Alys Swan-Jackson Price Stern Sloan (1999). (May be appropriate for 9-12 age group.)

(Fiction)

It’s Not the End of the World, by Judy Blume. Bradbury (1972).

My Not-So-Terrible Time at the Hippie Hotel, by Rosemary Graham.

Books for Elementary School Aged Children (6-12)

(Non-fiction)

A Kid’s Guide to Coming to Terms with Separation and Divorce, by Risa J. Garon. Children of Separation and Divorce Center, Inc. (July 1, 2000).

Annie Stories: A Special Kind of Storytelling, by Doris Brett. Workman Publishing (1986). Also recommended for younger elementary school children. See above.

Don’t Fall Apart on Saturdays! The Children’s Divorce Survival Book, by Adolph Moser. Landmark Editions Inc (May 19, 2000).

Help! A Girl’s Guide to Divorce and Stepfamilies, by Nancy Holyoke. American Girl (September 1, 1999).

How It Feels When Parents Divorce, by Jill Krementz. Knopf (February 12, 1988).

Kid’s Guide to Coming to Terms with Separation and Divorce, by Risa J. Garon. Children of Separation and Divorce Center, Inc. (July 1, 2000).

Let’s Talk About Your Parents’ Divorce, by Elizabeth Weitzman. PowerKids Press (1996).

Magic Words Handbook for Kids, by Kent Winchester. Ladybug Press (October 20, 1998).

My Mom and Dad Are Getting a Divorce, by Florence Bienefeld, Ph.D. Authorhouse (December 1, 2002).

My Parents Are Divorced, Too: A Book for Kids by Kids, by Jan Blackstone-Ford, Annie Ford, Stephen Ford & Melanie Ford. Magination Press (1998).

My Parents’ Divorce (How Do I Feel About), by Julia Cole. Aladdin Books Ltd. (1997).

On the Day His Daddy Left, by Eric J. Adams. Albert Whitman & Company (2003).

The Days of Summer, by Eve Bunting. Harcourt Children’s Books (2001).

We’re Having a Tuesday, by Dk Simoneau. AC Publications Group (April 1, 2006)

When Divorce Hits Home, by Thea Joselow and Beth Joselow. Authors Choice Press (November 1, 2000).

When My Parents Forgot How to Be Friends, by Jennifer Moore-Mallinos (2005). A sensitively written book that assures boys and girls that children are in no way responsible for their parents’ inability to get along together. This book can be used to initiate conversation between parents and children in this situation.

Who Will Lead Kiddush? by Barbara Pomerantz. Union of American Hebrew Congregations (1998).


(Fiction)

Dear Mr. Henshaw, by Beverly Cleary. HarperTrophy (June 30, 2000).

The Divorce Express, by Paula Danziger. Paper Star (1982).

The Top-Secret Journal Of Fiona Claire Jardin, by Robin Cruise. Harcourt Brace & Co. (1998).

DVD & Video for Children

[Use › at top left to view additional videos in this series.]

Children: The Experts on Divorce, Family Connections Publishing Co. (801) 268- 2800

Listen to the Children, Victor/Harder Productions (313) 661-6730. Children speaking about their divorce experiences interspersed with expert guidance.

Internet Resources for Kids

A Kid’s Guide To Divorce: In very simple and reassuring language, the writers of this site explain what divorce is and is not, what kind of feelings one might have, what life after divorce may look like, and how, just as they did not cause the divorce, kids cannot cause their parents to get back together.

Chat First: Information and activities for children who have experienced parental separation and/or divorce and their parents and other caregivers. The information provided is based on research and has been designed to directly assist the children and young people to understand and cope with the changes involved. The parents’ section is intended to assist parents and/or other caregivers to understand and support their children through the family transition and beyond.

Help Your Child Cope with Divorce: Earthquake in Zipland: “Earthquake in Zipland” is the first computer game designed to help children of separated or divorced parents cope with their new reality.

KidsGrowth: Tailored specifically toward the concerns and interests of today’s parents by well-respected medical leaders in the field of pediatrics and adolescent medicine.

Kids Turn Central: Special stories, kids’ web sites, and information for children in the divorce transition.

Our Great Kids: Intended to help moms and dads who live apart to stay up-to-date on what goes on daily in their children’s lives—even when they are not physically with them. Parents can log into their child’s own special page where they can upload pictures to share and create web based calendars to help stay organized by keeping track of important dates with e-mail reminders. There also is space to write some of the exciting things their child does—that the absent parent would love to hear about! Can be used by grandparents and other family members, too.


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